Volunteer at CCR! Adopt A Dog!
 

We are THRILLED to report that as of today (5/9), the shelter is once again open for volunteers and visitors!  We have received some very encouraging results from our latest round of flu testing with the University of Wisconsin, which indicate that we have hopefully succeeded in preventing the flu from spreading any farther than our one sick pup, Jasmine.   We are so proud of our awesome staff and vets for responding to this crisis so proactively and carefully, and are continuing to take our vets’ lead on safely moving forward. Due to the fact that Jasmine is currently still isolated in our facility, we are still observing a total quarantine protocol for her, and are awaiting best-practice instructions from our vets on how to move forward with dog-to-dog introductions.  For the moment, adoptions will proceed with caution, to single-dog households, and with the understanding that an additional week of isolation is required for all new dogs entering their homes.  We are very hopeful that we have seen the tail end of CIV at CCR, but want to act as conservatively as possible to ensure the continued safety of our pups and our community.  We are SO thankful for your well-wishes, donations, and support throughout this time, and are so excited to welcome back our volunteers and visitors – the pups have missed you!

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Ever wonder what happens to shelter dogs that are not perfect, are considered too young, too old, too sick or who have special needs?

Traditionally, these animals were automatically euthanized at area shelters. However, today, Chicago Canine Rescue Foundation exists to give many of these animals a second chance, too!

CCRF was founded in 2001 to help find permanent, loving homes for homeless dogs in our city. CCRF has saved the lives of over 3,000 dogs, cats, kittens (yes, we have started helping a few felines each year, too!) and puppies.

CCRF assists the animals that are the MOST vulnerable in our city – the dogs and cats that are slated for euthanasia because they are too old, too young, too injured, have disabilities, or have simply been overlooked for too long by potential adopters at other shelters.